Category Archives: Business / Commercial Law

Written Co-Ownership Agreement Poniatowski Leding Parikh

The Risks of Co-Ownership Agreements

Co-ownership of properties is a very common financial arrangement in real estate. With two or more persons involved in a purchase, their combined buying power can expand the number of properties that they can pursue. One party involved may also provide a higher credit score or more substantial assets that could win better loan terms.

Co-ownership lowers the business risk for both partners because it becomes a shared risk, rather than one which must be borne by a single person. However, these are long-term business relationships (even those between family members), and time can change the motivations of the people involved. Indeed, one partner may decide they wish to exit, and has the legal right to do so (more on that below.) Much can go wrong in a co-ownership partnership, if the possibility of these future issues arising is not accounted for in the initial partnership agreement.

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Business Debt Collection Ideas PLP Law Attorney

How a Business Can Improve Debt Collection

One of the most frustrating areas of maintaining a successful business is collecting on receivables. It has been said that “a sale to a customer is no more than a gift, until the payment for it has been collected and gets deposited in the bank.” Many businesses learn this truth the hard way, generating great sales and revenue, but suffering from terrible cash flow because payments due are not forthcoming in a timely manner.

Improving Debt Collection

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Appellate Court Holds That Attorneys Fees Not Recoverable Even Though Credit Application Contained A “Prevailing Party Attorneys Fees” Clause

business contract transaction agreement signatures

Many businesses rely on a credit application for the terms and conditions of its sales to its customers. Often the credit application is the only document that the customer actually signs. Relying on invoices, purchase orders, bills of lading, delivery tickets and the like that are not signed by the customer in the ordinary course of business will not support an award of attorneys fees in the event of a collection action and judgment. This is true even though these documents may contain a prevailing party attorneys fees clause.  Because the credit application is usually signed by the customer, however, the creditor/seller often successfully relies on the prevailing party attorneys fees clause in the signed credit application for an award of attorneys fees in the event of collection litigation and judgment. Continue reading

The Biggest Things to Look For When Buying a Business

Bay Area real estate attorney Oakland

It’s usually easier to buy an existing business than to start up your own. This is because everything is already in place, including a customer base. However, there are some things to look for when you buy a fully-operational business. Follow the tips listed below to give yourself a fair chance of success at converting someone else’s business into your own. Continue reading

What is the Appropriate Leasing Term for you?

bay area, appropriate leasing term, real estate attorneys, lawyers

 

Signing a commercial lease is a significant commitment for most businesses.  Whether negotiating or renewing a commercial lease,  it can be difficult to determine the best lease term for your business. Many companies settle for a “standard” 5-year term, which may be appropriate. But there are factors to consider that could make a shorter or longer term more advantageous for your particular business. The information in this discussion may be useful helping you arrive at an appropriate lease term. However, if you’re still not sure, the best approach might be to consult with commercial leasing attorneys to advise you. Continue reading

Non-Disclosure Agreement Do’s and Don’ts

non-disclosure aggrement, commerical attorney, business attorney, attorney, lawyer, castro valley, hayward, pleasanton, oaklandWe live in a highly competitive business environment, which pits people against firms, and major corporations against small businesses. When negotiating transactions, individuals and companies must prevent unauthorized disclosure of their trade secrets and proprietary information, which is so vitally important in such a competitive business environment. One of the ways for professionals and firms to protect trade secrets and proprietary information when negotiating transactions is through a properly drafted Non-Disclosure Agreement (NDA). With an NDA, the parties to a transaction are prohibited from sharing with third parties trade secrets and proprietary information that is disclosed to them in connection with the negotiating and due diligence of a proposed transaction. Continue reading

Res Judicata Cannot Be Used to Shield Fraudulent Debtor Behavior

In the recent case of Wells Fargo Bank, National Association v. Weinberg, the Court set an important precedent that applies to the amendment of judgments to add individual debtors as alter egos of the corporation:

 

“The doctrine of res judicata1 did not bar the amendment of a judgment to add an alter ego2 as a judgment debtor, even if the issue of alter ego could have been raised earlier, as long as alter ego liability is a separate and distinct claim from the underlying action.”

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Court Limits Scope Of Guarantor Waivers

Note to readers: This brief post covers only one key aspect of this important case. There are other ramifications for contractual relationships that could impact you. Check with us for more details if you have an interest, or any concerns.

In the recent court case of California Bank & Trust v. Del Ponti, the court set an important precedent that applies to disputes on commercial loans between property developers and lenders.  In effect, a commercial lender cannot enforce waivers in guarantee agreements which are unlawful or otherwise contravene public policy.  Guarantor waivers are limited to certain legal and statutory defenses specifically set forth in the agreements, but not equitable defenses.  Continue reading

How Far Can Brief Ubiquitous Language Go in Trademarks?

Business Attorney Oakland Law Firm Explores the Nuances of Trademarks

 

Business Attorney Pleasanton“Brief ubiquitous language” refers to small parts of a well-known trade name. Trademark questions often land on gray areas in the legal space. Even if you’re a trained business attorney, you can easily find yourself struggling to understand the subtleties of the Trademark Office’s reasoning. Legal fights over trademark nuances happen all the time. Recently, Apple lost a suit claiming that a smaller company (“DOPi”) could not use Apple’s little “i” in its name.

 

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California’s New “Yelp” Bill Empowers Consumers

Commercial Attorney Oakland Law Firm Discusses Free Speech Issue

Commercial Attorney San FranciscoFor the past decade, California businesses have struggled to figure out how to manage negative online reviews and commentary. Sometimes an outraged owner has even sought out a small business attorney to take their critics to court, claiming that their negative unjust reviews cost them business.

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